Confluence Library

A brief summary of the treaties and Acts signed by Presidents Lincoln, Johnson, and Grant in the 1860s and 1870s which affected Native tribes, especially the Nez Perce.

The site of Sacajawea State Park had been important for trade and kinship. The Corps of Discovery were led there by Sacajawea in 1805. By the 1870s, settlers took the land and local tribes were sent off to reservations.

The confluence of the Snake and Columbia Rivers was a major uniting force for tribes of the Columbia River basin. It became a major site for settlers later, as the waterways provided a convenient mode of transportation.

The Sacajawea State Park area saw a lot of change between the surrender of Chief Joseph and the revelation of the Hanford nuclear operations only a century later: railroads, dams, and plutonium replaced trade and family.

The Vancouver Land Bridge site was rich with biodiversity prior to settlers’ advancement. Seated on a floodplain near Mt. St Helens, it was home to savanna, hardwood forest, and prairie. Today it is home to Ft Vancouver.

This gallery features images of children through Celilo Village in daily life, at work and play.

This gallery features photographs of young women taken near Celilo Village between 1902-1938.

In this Confluence Podcast episode, Josiah Pinkham discusses the spirituality entity of Celilo, resilience, sacred responsibility and the difference between Native and non-Native culture.

In this episode of the Confluence Podcast, Nez Perce elder Silas Whitman discusses Celilo, sovereignty, learning from the elders and inter-tribal exchange.

Roberta Conner discusses Celilo Falls, traditional lifeways, and how oral traditions carry important truths in a episode of the Confluence Podcast.