Confluence Library

The Sacajawea State Park area saw a lot of change between the surrender of Chief Joseph and the revelation of the Hanford nuclear operations only a century later: railroads, dams, and plutonium replaced trade and family.

The Vancouver Land Bridge site was rich with biodiversity prior to settlers’ advancement. Seated on a floodplain near Mt. St Helens, it was home to savanna, hardwood forest, and prairie. Today it is home to Ft Vancouver.

Jane Jacobsen talks about how Confluence was created as a response to the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial, and the decision by tribes to invite Maya Lin to design the artwork, as well as the importance of respect for places.

The Chinook are one of several Lower Chinook people indigenous to the western Washington coast. Though not federally recognized, the Chinook were long recognized as prodigious traders across the Northwest coast.

The Nez Perce are a tribe found throughout Eastern Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The Nez Perce were known for their early openness to white settlers, and later for their persecution. Special focus on Chief Timothy.

This gallery features photographs of young women taken near Celilo Village between 1902-1938.

This gallery features images of children through Celilo Village in daily life, at work and play.

Roberta Conner discusses Celilo Falls, traditional lifeways, and how oral traditions carry important truths in a episode of the Confluence Podcast.

In this Confluence Podcast episode, Josiah Pinkham discusses the spirituality entity of Celilo, resilience, sacred responsibility and the difference between Native and non-Native culture.

In this episode of the Confluence Podcast, Nez Perce elder Silas Whitman discusses Celilo, sovereignty, learning from the elders and inter-tribal exchange.