Confluence Library

Today on the Confluence Story Gathering Podcast we explore the concept of monuments with the help of three Indigenous women who live in the Pacific Northwest.

 

 

On this episode of the Confluence Story Gathering Podcast we dive into the current cultural discussion on monuments and who tells the stories behind monuments, to ask how do we memorialize our history today?

 

As America re-examines its relationship with history, many of us are taking a new look at the people who have been held up as heroes of our past. Monuments are being replaced, including the statue of Marcus Whitman that is in the US Capitol, soon to be replaced by a statue of fishing rights activist Billy Frank Jr. Writer Sarah Vowell dives into this on the 2nd episode of Season 2 of Confluence Podcast,

America’s relationship with history is changing and, with it, our views of public monuments. In this launch episode of Season 2 of the Confluence Podcast, writer Sarah Vowell talks about how we express our stories and values in public places, and how to find joy in the darkness.

This podcast is on the Redheart Band and the memorial that is held every year in Vancouver, WA to honor them. The Redheart Band was imprisoned by the US military, during the “Nez Perce Wars”, in 1877 — a little boy died in captivity and 1998, an annual memorial that began to honor him and the Redheart Band.

 

Two new episodes of the Confluence Story Gathering podcasts explore racism along the Columbia River in the 1950s. Parallel Lives is the two part story of Ed Edmo and Lani Roberts growing up in The Dalles, Oregon. Their juxtaposed stories give a full picture of rural Oregon and the parallel lives they led along the N’chi-Wana River.

Two new episodes of the Confluence Story Gathering podcasts explore racism along the Columbia River in the 1950s. Parallel Lives is the two part story of Ed Edmo and Lani Roberts growing up in The Dalles, Oregon. Their juxtaposed stories give a full picture of rural Oregon and the parallel lives they led along the N’chi-Wana River.

Paul Lumley, the Executive Director of NAYA PDX, talks about how treaties are a source of power for tribes, the importance of tribes being in charge of their own science, and the resilence and passion tribes have to maintain their traditions.

Tanna Engdahl, the spiritual leader of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, talks about Cowlitz federal recognition, the experience of non-treaty tribes, the impact of the disease on the Cowlitz and the spiritual power of sacred sites and ancestors.

In this episode, anthropologist and Grand Ronde historian David Lewis, discusses the loss of land, tribe-settler interactions, the historical context of Grand Ronde’s treaty negotiation, and protecting rights that weren’t guaranteed in treaties.