Confluence Library

Social discourse is the way most individuals will have learned about Kennewick Man. In this article, communications scholar Cynthia-Lou Coleman (Osage) the historical pseudoscience roots and present impact of the coverage — through newspapers, blogs, websites, and books– surrounding the The Ancient One. This type of coverage has direct impact on the Indigenous Peoples from the Columbia River.

Answering the question, “Who Gets to be an American?” Elizabeth Woody, Chuck Sams, and Patricia Whitefoot talk about the complex nature of US citizenship, the sovereignty of tribal nations, the responsibility to the land, the kinship network to the non-human elements of the land, and the relationship to the world.

This story collection is based on the conversation between Patricia Whitefoot (Yakama Nation), Elizabeth Woody (Warm Springs), and Chuck Sams (CTUIR) that we live-streamed on May 20th.

On May 20th, Patricia Whitefoot (Yakama Nation), Elizabeth Woody (Warm Springs), and Chuck Sams (Umatilla) joined together for a thoughtful exploration of this theme in light of our country’s colonial legacy and Indigenous people’s enduring spirit and cultural resilience.

Wilbur Slockish (Klickitat, Yakama) talks about the removal of rights and forcible relocation to reservations such as Fort Simcoe.

Bill Yallup Jr (Yakama) talks about teaching self-care and insight.

In this excerpt from an interview with Chief Delvis Heath, he discusses tribal jurisdiction of the Columbia.

Bill Yallup Jr (Yakama) talks about Kamiakin’s attempts to join tribes into one to face the incoming white settlers and keep their lands.