Tag Result

tag: Nez Perce

In this Confluence Podcast episode, Josiah Pinkham discusses the spirituality entity of Celilo, resilience, sacred responsibility and the difference between Native and non-Native culture.

Roberta Conner discusses Celilo Falls, traditional lifeways, and how oral traditions carry important truths in a episode of the Confluence Podcast.

The theme of this video is resilience and survival. 4 Native individuals talk about resilience, survival, river rights, and the fight for recognition. By Tule Films with support from the National Endowment from the Arts.

The theme of this video is treaties. Seven Native individuals talk about treaty protections, property rights, culture, and first rights. By Tule Films with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The theme of this video is language. Six Native individuals talk about language and its importance to cultural preservation. By Tule Films with the support of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Bobbie Conner (Cayuse, Nez Perce, Umatilla) talks about Native fortitude.

Wilfred and Bessie Scott (Nez Perce) talk about military action against the Nez Perce that killed several children, including Bessie’s then-five-year-old great-aunt.

Wilfred and Bessie Scott (Nez Perce) talk about the song I Am Special- iin wees hete’ew- that was created to help children’s self-esteem.

Wilfred and Bessie Scott (Nez Perce) talk about their experiences in the Redheart Band at ceremonies.

Bobbie Conner (Cayuse/Nez Perce/Umatilla) talks about divide and conquer tactics used in American federal policy.

Bobbie Conner (Cayuse/Nez Perce/Umatilla) talks about treaties and their impact on fishing and property rights. 1:41.

Antone Minthorn (Cayuse, Nez Perce, Umatilla) talks about life on the Umatilla Reservation, the struggle for sovereignty, and Maya Lin. Fully subtitled. 2:32.

The Sacajawea State Park area saw a lot of change between the surrender of Chief Joseph and the revelation of the Hanford nuclear operations only a century later: railroads, dams, and plutonium replaced trade and family.

Many different tribes came together at the site of modern-day Sacajawea State Park. Although to later explorers it seemed barren, this crucial trading site was also an important site for weddings and kinship exchanges.

Chief Timothy Park, in Washington, is on an island off the Snake River. Chief Timothy Park is close to Lower Granite Dam, which has a fish ladder. The park is home to a Confluence “Listening Circle” amphitheater.

The Nez Perce are a tribe found throughout Eastern Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The Nez Perce were known for their early openness to white settlers, and later for their persecution. Special focus on Chief Timothy.

A brief summary of the treaties and Acts signed by Presidents Lincoln, Johnson, and Grant in the 1860s and 1870s which affected Native tribes, especially the Nez Perce.

Lieutenant C.E.S. Wood an army officer who watched the Nez Perce and had a personal relationship with Chief Joseph in 1877. This article contains excerpts from an essay published by Lt. Wood on the “Indian Question.”

The 1878 eclipse brought the Nez Perce War to public eye and allowed them to secretly return home from Canada. At the same time, the Bannock were cleared out of Malheur by the Army. Canneries profited from the eclipse.

The cultivation of apples and other orchard fruit at Fort Vancouver was highly successful, expanding to a third site at Fort Simcoe. The Nez Perce and Yakama quickly took to the crop, finding it productive and valuable.