Confluence Library

Today on the Confluence Story Gathering Podcast we explore the concept of monuments with the help of three Indigenous women who live in the Pacific Northwest.

 

 

On this episode of the Confluence Story Gathering Podcast we dive into the current cultural discussion on monuments and who tells the stories behind monuments, to ask how do we memorialize our history today?

 

In this episode, speakers discuss a recent documentary on Native American food sovereignty called “Gather.” Our conversation includes two of the people featured in the film: Nephi Craig, a chef from the White Mountain Apache Nation in Arizona and Samuel Gensaw, the co-founder of Ancestral Guard.

 

As America re-examines its relationship with history, many of us are taking a new look at the people who have been held up as heroes of our past. Monuments are being replaced, including the statue of Marcus Whitman that is in the US Capitol, soon to be replaced by a statue of fishing rights activist Billy Frank Jr. Writer Sarah Vowell dives into this on the 2nd episode of Season 2 of Confluence Podcast,

America’s relationship with history is changing and, with it, our views of public monuments. In this launch episode of Season 2 of the Confluence Podcast, writer Sarah Vowell talks about how we express our stories and values in public places, and how to find joy in the darkness.

In this episode, we get to hear traditional stories from Ciarra Greene (Nimiipuu/Nez Perce Tribe). Her academic background is in chemistry and environmental science.

Today on the Confluence Podcast, two members of Northwest Indigenous nations, David Lewis and Teara Farrow Ferman discuss the history of the Columbia watershed and new efforts to improve wildlife habitat and water quality

“Salmon have always kept their word…” In this episode, we talk with filmmaker Woodrow Hunt a Klamath/Modoc/ Cherokee descendent, and Bobbie Conner, a member of the Confederate Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Executive Director of the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, about Hunt’s recent film, Salmon’s Agreement.

Pete Wilson, Nimiipuu, talks about his involvement in the Redheart Memorial and his role in the pipe ceremony.

This podcast is on the Redheart Band and the memorial that is held every year in Vancouver, WA to honor them. The Redheart Band was imprisoned by the US military, during the “Nez Perce Wars”, in 1877 — a little boy died in captivity and 1998, an annual memorial that began to honor him and the Redheart Band.