Confluence Library

In this article, Keri E. Iyall Smith (Cowlitz) details how, by taking cues from Indigenous Peoples who see the natural world as relatives, equal to humans, entitled to protections and thoughtful (minimal) use, it is possible to shift away from attitudes that expanded in the colonial era, which see land as a thing to be conquered and with resources to be extracted.

Since 2011, the Confluence Story Gathering project has conducted interviews with more than forty Indigenous Elders and leaders from the Columbia River system. Learn more about the history of this project and what protocol to follow when using these videos.

Confluence is honored to work with eight sovereign tribes from the Columbia River Basin. Each has a vast and rich history and enrolled members continue to maintain cultural, economic and environmental connections to their homelands. Here are some basic facts about each of these tribes with tribal resources to learn more.

Read here on how to weclome a Native educator in your classroom for a residency or field trip

This is a collection of oral history interviews centering around the Redheart Ceremony, which occurs every year on the grounds of Fort Vancouver, to honor the Nez Perce Redheart Band who were imprisoned there during the Nez Perce Wars.

Confluence recently premiered the film “Salmon’s Agreement,” which was followed by a Q&A with the filmmaker Woodrow Hunt (of Tule Films) and with Roberta Conner (Tamastslikt Cultural Institute). Many attendees asked how they can help the salmon. Here are some resources to get started.

Social discourse is the way most individuals will have learned about Kennewick Man. In this article, communications scholar Cynthia-Lou Coleman (Osage) the historical pseudoscience roots and present impact of the coverage — through newspapers, blogs, websites, and books– surrounding the The Ancient One. This type of coverage has direct impact on the Indigenous Peoples from the Columbia River.

The text of a Chinook Blessing delivered by Chinook Tribal Chief Gary Johnson in Chinook homelands, November 18, 2005.

Over the next seven weeks until the week of Thanksgiving, Confluence will be sharing resources centered around the 6 Critical Orientations for Indigenous Studies Curriculum. This post summarizes all the resources from our Intro Week.