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Listen to this podcast from the archives. This episode of Oregon Territory first aired on Oregon Public Broadcasting on March 9, 2007, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the flooding of Celilo Falls.

In this installment of Stories from River shorts, Bryson Liberty tells funny stories from Celilo Falls and a few facts about fishing and fish runs are related.

This gallery features photographs of fishing at Celilo Falls.

Johnny Jackson (Yakama, Cascades) talks about fishing at Celilo Falls with his family.

Aurelia Stacona (Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs) talks about falling into the Celilo Falls as a child.

Wilbur Slockish (Yakama, Klickitat) talks about finding Shoshone Falls, ID and listening to the falls crash.

Kettle Falls was the largest waterfall of the Columbia River. Kettle Falls was for over 10,000 years a major indigenous fishing and trade site. In 1940, they were dammed by the Grand Coulee and formed Lake Roosevelt.

In this excerpt, Bryson Liberty talks about how many people came to Celilo in the fall and also talks about the hundred-year-old shacks at Celilo.

In this excerpt, Bryson Liberty talks about seeing Celilo with his grandparents and aunt, as well as the trade at Celilo.

This gallery features images of bridges and roads near Celilo Village.

This gallery features images of children through Celilo Village in daily life, at work and play.

This gallery features photographs of young women taken near Celilo Village between 1902-1938.

This curriculum is often used by schools that are part of Confluence in the Classroom. Teaching a curriculum such as this to students better prepares them for having the Native educator in the classroom.

The theme of this video is Celilo Falls. Five Native individuals talk about Celilo Falls and the Columbia River. By Tule Films with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Bryson Liberty (Cayuse, Umatilla, Walla Walla) talks about funny stories from Celilo Falls, including a man who regularly fell in and a man who crawled across Celilo Falls for a date.

Bill Yallup Jr (Yakama, Rock Creek) talks about the wealth of Celilo Falls and its trade importance.

Virginia Beavert (Yakama) talks about the loss of Celilo Falls and its impact on fishing.

In this article, Keri E. Iyall Smith (Cowlitz) details how, by taking cues from Indigenous Peoples who see the natural world as relatives, equal to humans, entitled to protections and thoughtful (minimal) use, it is possible to shift away from attitudes that expanded in the colonial era, which see land as a thing to be conquered and with resources to be extracted.

This Story Collection explores ways of looking at our economy in terms of our environment, our history and our connections to each other.

In this excerpt, Bryson Liberty talks about how scaffolds were built and the process of fishing.