News Archive

September 6, 2017

Don't Miss These Upcoming Confluence Events

Sandy River Delta Make a Difference Day Help rebuild the Confluence Trail to the Bird Blind! October 28, 2017 8:30am - 1:00pm Sandy River Delta Park, Troutdale, OR Click here to learn more.   Confluence Story Gathering Story-driven...   more >

August 27, 2017

Confluence News & Events – August 2017

Thank You Pink Martini! A heartfelt thank you to Confluence board member Thomas Lauderdale and Pink Martini for hosting an incredible benefit concert on Saturday, August 19th in Lake Oswego.  We...   more >

August 20, 2017

Sandy River Delta Make a Difference Day

Sandy River DeltaMake a Difference DayOctober 28, 20178:30am - 1:00pm Confluence will host a trail repair party at the Sandy River Delta on "Make a Difference Day," October 28, 2017. We...   more >

July 6, 2017

Confluence Upcoming Events

Confuence in the Community is a series of public events that fuse art, culture and heritage to engage the communities around our project sites. All are welcome!   Native Plant Walk with...   more >

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Introducing Tributaries: A Confluence History Blog

July 28, 2016

Stories are like tributaries. They shape the landscape as they confluence with other waters flowing toward the ocean. The history of the Columbia River system is filled with countless tales that help us shape our understanding of our region and connect in a more meaningful way to where we’ve been and where we’re going. This month, Confluence began posting weekly blog posts in which historian Mary Rose documents a few of these stories, ones that connect one end of the river to another and events from long ago that affect our lives today. 

In her first two posts, Mary Rose writes about the origins of the Northwest apple industry. It story begins at what is now the entrance to the Confluence Land Bridge in Vancouver, where the oldest apple tree in Washington still produces fruit. Find out also how Cape Disappointment got it's name. Hint: It's no longer disappointing to anyone! Check back later for the early impressions of the Columbia River from the explorers whose names still fill our maps. 

 

"Unwalking" the Lewis and Clark Trail 

Right at the spot where Lewis and Clark reached the Pacific Ocean, a group of artists began a remarkable, month-long journey this week. Signal Fire, an arts nonprofit, organized this wilderness residency for young artists from all over the country to retrace the steps of the explorers and contemplate a more inclusive history of this landscape. We're so pleased their trip began in Chinook homelands at Cape Disappointment, Confluence's first project site. The artists will visit four more Confluence sites as they travel all the way to Montana to reconsider the legacy of those who lived 200 years ago and what it means today. 

 

Stories From the River

Native wapato blooms again in the reclaimed and restored wetland near the Confluence Bird Blind at the Sandy River Delta in Troutdale, Oregon. Grand Ronde tradition keeper Greg Archuleta talked about the cultural and environmental significance of this once-plentiful root as he shared his knowledge and family history for the Confluence Oral History Project. It's one of many first person narratives Confluence is recording in collaboration with our partners at NW Documentary. Video and transcripts of the interviews will be archived at Washington State University through the Plateau People's Portal. These records are helping to preserve native cultures, values and traditions. This is just another way Confluence connects people to place through art and education.