Tag Archives: yakama

Male Sage-grouse

“Really Fantastic and Great to Behold”

Take a closer look at the Great sage-grouse, a native bird species that was endangered by loss of habitat in the Columbia River region. This unusual bird plays an important cultural and environmental role in the desert lands of Oregon and Washington, and efforts are being made by the Yakama Nation to improve habitat and increase the number of sage-grouse living here. more >

Western Pond Turtles, familiarly known as Mud Turtles, once thrived near Fort Vancouver. By Jerry Kirkhart via Wikimedia Commons

Vancouver: Land of the Mud Turtles

By Mary Rose One hundred miles above the mouth of the Columbia River, the Hudson’s Bay Company built its premier fort in the West. The French Canadians called it “Jolie Prairie”[1] but long before the presence of outsiders, Native Americans … more >

Celilo Canal circa 1920 postcard.  Credit: A.M. Prentiss Photo. Published by Lipschuetz and Katz, Portland, Oregon. Card #401. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.

Before The Dam, Celilo Canal Built For ‘Progress’

By Mary Rose While researching the Washington Territory town of Ainsworth, near the Confluence Story Circles in today’s Pasco, Washington, I discovered a connection between the Celilo Canal and my elementary school. I grew up at Pasco, and learned that … more >

wapato tubers

Important Foods: Wapato

Wapato was a staple of the native diet throughout the Columbia River system. It still grows in the Northwest today, especially in restored lands such as the Sandy River Delta. In some places, wapato is no longer safe to eat because it absorbs metals and other pollutants. In others, it’s fine so make sure to check! more >

Color plate from a 1906 Toppenish Nursery Sales  Representative’s Guide

How Native Farmers Shaped the Northwest Apple Industry, Part 2: Snake River and Yakima Valley

When you bite into a northwest apple, you are tasting the history of this region. Washington State is the largest producer of apples in America. The well-known roots of this industry are connected to historic sites along the Columbia River system. What’s not so well known is the significant role Native American farmers played in the early years of modern apple production, as they adapted to tectonic changes brought by settlers. Part two of this series explores how apple production spread to eastern and central Washington. more >