Tag Archives: Pacific Northwest

Spearing salmon in the Long Narrows, 1901. In the 19th century spearing was the preferred way Indians fished in clear water that had good visibility of the fish. Gradually spears were replaced by dip nets made with a steel hoop and a net connected by wire rings, which would stay open until struck by a fish, which released a tonge and the net would fold around the fish like a purse. The practice of waiting for a fish to appear and catching it with a net is called roping. Most waters in this area were too turbulant or aeriated to see a fish, so neither spearing or roping was practiced as much as 'blind' dip netting. By 1939, a reporter noted that spearing was rarely used anymore and by 1950 had apparently ceased. Photo by Benjamin Gifford.

Complicated History of the River, Told Through Images

All tributaries eventually lead to the Big River that lead to the ocean. Using images and records, we take the wide view of the river system and see how connections to place and people are made through stories and culture. more >

Cape Horn, Columbia River, Oregon; Carleton Watkins

Images of the Northwest: Part I Carleton E. Watkins

The iconic landscapes of the Pacific Northwest have captured the imagination of many photographers and artists. The legacy of early photographer Carleton E. Watkins depicts an amazing perspective of this region. more >

Even after the advent of photography, artists played a role in capturing eclipses, he says. He points to this lithograph of a total eclipse in Wyoming in 1878, produced by a French artist named Etienne Trouvelot. It is less detailed than modern photographs, but arguably more beautiful. The lithograph leaves some room for interpretation, letting your eye and brain do the work. A photograph is more passive, simply collecting light through a lens. Etienne Trouvelot, Lithograph in colour, Total eclipse of sun; observed 29 July 1878. Science Museum / SSPL

Plunge Into Darkness Part III: The Great Eclipse of 1878

PLUNGE INTO DARKNESS: August 21, 2017, will be the first total solar eclipse that was visible in the Northwest since 1970. This is the third installment of a 4 part series that reviews the recorded total solar eclipses that affected people, legends and scientific discoveries with connections to the Pacific Northwest between 1503 and 1970. more >

The total solar eclipse on July 18, 1860 was the first to be so thoroughly observed and recorded by the scientific community. It occurred at a time when the world was experiencing an amazing revolution of fundamental scientific and technological discoveries and inventions across disciplines, including the light bulb, the periodic table, the first color photograph, dynamite, and the telephone. At the same time, many of the techniques for measuring, recording, and documenting these processes were also being pioneered.  Drawing by F.  Galton, 1860.

Plunge Into Darkness Part II

PLUNGE INTO DARKNESS: August 21, 2017, will be the first total solar eclipse that was visible in the Northwest since 1970. This is the second installment of a 4 part series that reviews the recorded total solar eclipses that affected people, legends and scientific discoveries with connections to the Pacific Northwest between 1503 and 1970. more >

An image from Journal to the Rocky Mountains in the Years 1804-5-6; As related by Patrick Gass, One of the Officers of the Expedition. Artist unknown, published in 1847. The Lewis and Clark party was weathering up to ten feet of snow in the mountains of Idaho on June 16, 1806. They were headed home. No mention of the solar eclipse appears in any of their journals.

Plunge Into Darkness: Earliest Recorded Solar Eclipses in the Pacific Northwest

PLUNGE INTO DARKNESS: August 21, 2017, will be the first total solar eclipse that was visible in the Northwest since 1970. Introducing a 4-part blog series that reviews the recorded total solar eclipses that affected people, legends and scientific discoveries with connections to the Pacific Northwest between 1503 and 1970. more >