Tag Archives: Kettle Falls

3155A. In 1941, the photographer Ray Atkeson observed this fisherman "throwing back, over a period, a dozen salmon nearly two feet long. He disdained them as not suitable for his purpose." This catch is typical of Columbia River salmon born before the dams were built. Fish were big and rich in oil because they traveled a thousand miles to spawn in Canada. The size of a fish is proportional to the length of their journey to spawn. The largest of the fish became extinct when the Grand Coulee dam was built in upstate Washington and blocked all Canadian salmon.

On The Water: Salmon as a Gift Economy

The salmon of the Columbia River system is more than a commodity. It is “gift” and it must be passed on, and in accepting the gift, the receiver assumes responsibilities. more >

View III  Ike's Raft & Roos

A View of the Columbia in 1920 Part III – Historic Glimpses from Kettle Falls to Pasco

Part III in Lewis Freeman’s journey down the Columbia River covers stretches of rapids between Kettle Falls and Pasco, WA, now home to the Confluence Story Circles. more >

Kettle Falls in Early 1900’s

Kettle Falls, Bigger than Celilo, Silenced 75 Years Ago

Taking a brief detour from the journey of Lewis Freeman, this week looks more deeply at Kettle Falls. Like Celilo Falls, Kettle Falls is another example of the mighty Columbia being ‘tamed’ by hydroelectric infrastructure, and a story of dramatic loss. more >

Kettle Falls, photographed by the Spokane Camera Club in 1938. The rapids were inundated by Roosevelt Lake, reservoir to the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942.

A View of the Columbia in 1920 Part II

In part II of our journey down the Columbia, the words of Lewis Freeman describe a series of harrowing rapids as he travels down river from a point near the mouth in British Columbia. more >