Tributaries: A Confluence History Blog

Maya Lin has said, “I try to give people a different way of looking at their surroundings.” As you visit and explore a Confluence Project site, share your observations or new found discoveries in this open community of ideas.


Monthly Archives: August 2017

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Plunge Into Darkness: Baker City, Oregon in 1918 Part V

The Great American Eclipse of August 21st, 2017 will be remembered for its traffic jams. There weren’t as many cars in 1918 but many descended on the Eastern Oregon town of Baker City of watch the eclipse then. more >

“Standing atop Mount Santa Lucia in northern California at approximately 3:50 p.m. on January 1, 1889, Carleton Watkins was able to make only one exposure during the instant of complete eclipse. Accompanied by professors from the University of California and the United States Naval Observatory, Watkins waited slightly more than an hour for the moon to begin its movement and assume its temporary position directly in front of the sun. The radiating sun, its brilliance hidden by the black moon, lies suspended over a sea of clouds whose rippling waves dominate the sky. Only the inclusion of the treetops in the foreground serves to ground the image in a familiar reality.” J. P. Getty Museum Collection

Plunge Into Darkness “A Fateful Eclipse”

PLUNGE INTO DARKNESS: August 21, 2017, will be the first total solar eclipse that was visible in the Northwest since 1970. We’ve expanded the series into 5 parts that review the recorded total solar eclipses that affected people, legends and scientific discoveries with connections to the Pacific Northwest between 1503 and 1970. This post explores fateful eclipse of January 1, 1889. more >

Even after the advent of photography, artists played a role in capturing eclipses, he says. He points to this lithograph of a total eclipse in Wyoming in 1878, produced by a French artist named Etienne Trouvelot. It is less detailed than modern photographs, but arguably more beautiful. The lithograph leaves some room for interpretation, letting your eye and brain do the work. A photograph is more passive, simply collecting light through a lens. Etienne Trouvelot, Lithograph in colour, Total eclipse of sun; observed 29 July 1878. Science Museum / SSPL

Plunge Into Darkness Part III: The Great Eclipse of 1878

PLUNGE INTO DARKNESS: August 21, 2017, will be the first total solar eclipse that was visible in the Northwest since 1970. This is the third installment of a 4 part series that reviews the recorded total solar eclipses that affected people, legends and scientific discoveries with connections to the Pacific Northwest between 1503 and 1970. more >