Tributaries: A Confluence History Blog

Maya Lin has said, “I try to give people a different way of looking at their surroundings.” As you visit and explore a Confluence Project site, share your observations or new found discoveries in this open community of ideas.


Monthly Archives: July 2017

The total solar eclipse on July 18, 1860 was the first to be so thoroughly observed and recorded by the scientific community. It occurred at a time when the world was experiencing an amazing revolution of fundamental scientific and technological discoveries and inventions across disciplines, including the light bulb, the periodic table, the first color photograph, dynamite, and the telephone. At the same time, many of the techniques for measuring, recording, and documenting these processes were also being pioneered.  Drawing by F.  Galton, 1860.

Plunge Into Darkness Part II

PLUNGE INTO DARKNESS: August 21, 2017, will be the first total solar eclipse that was visible in the Northwest since 1970. This is the second installment of a 4 part series that reviews the recorded total solar eclipses that affected people, legends and scientific discoveries with connections to the Pacific Northwest between 1503 and 1970. more >

An image from Journal to the Rocky Mountains in the Years 1804-5-6; As related by Patrick Gass, One of the Officers of the Expedition. Artist unknown, published in 1847. The Lewis and Clark party was weathering up to ten feet of snow in the mountains of Idaho on June 16, 1806. They were headed home. No mention of the solar eclipse appears in any of their journals.

Plunge Into Darkness: Earliest Recorded Solar Eclipses in the Pacific Northwest

PLUNGE INTO DARKNESS: August 21, 2017, will be the first total solar eclipse that was visible in the Northwest since 1970. Introducing a 4-part blog series that reviews the recorded total solar eclipses that affected people, legends and scientific discoveries with connections to the Pacific Northwest between 1503 and 1970. more >