Tributaries: A Confluence History Blog

Maya Lin has said, “I try to give people a different way of looking at their surroundings.” As you visit and explore a Confluence Project site, share your observations or new found discoveries in this open community of ideas.


Monthly Archives: July 2016

ColumbiaInASquall

By Land and By Sea, First Reports of the Great River

First impressions of the Columbia River from European and American explorers were big news at the time and continue to shape our understanding of the Northwest. By land and by sea, the early reports of the Columbia River paint a picture of an indigenous canoe culture and lush landscape. more >

North Head lighthouse at Cape Disappointment at the mouth of the Columbia River. Photo by 
Photo credit: weathercrazy82 https://www.wunderground.com/wximage/weathercrazy82/174

Cape’s Name Reflects Disappointment Only Of Early Explorers

Place names can be windows into history. So what to make of a name like Cape Disappointment? This gorgeous Washington State Park is Confluence’s first project site, with several art/landscape features designed by celebrated artist Maya Lin. A visit there is certainly not disappointing! Turns out, this picturesque cape was a disappointment only to early western explorers. more >

Color plate from a 1906 Toppenish Nursery Sales  Representative’s Guide

How Native Farmers Shaped the Northwest Apple Industry, Part 2: Snake River and Yakima Valley

When you bite into a northwest apple, you are tasting the history of this region. Washington State is the largest producer of apples in America. The well-known roots of this industry are connected to historic sites along the Columbia River system. What’s not so well known is the significant role Native American farmers played in the early years of modern apple production, as they adapted to tectonic changes brought by settlers. Part two of this series explores how apple production spread to eastern and central Washington. more >

AppleImage3

How Native Farmers Shaped the Northwest Apple Industry, Part 1: Origins

When you bite into a northwest apple, you are tasting the history of this region. Washington State is the largest producer of apples in America. The well-known roots of this industry are connected to historic sites along the Columbia River system. What’s not so well known is the significant role Native American farmers played in the early years of modern apple production, as they adapted to tectonic changes brought by settlers. In this two part series, we’ll look at three of the earliest northwest apple orchards at Fort Vancouver, Chief Timothy’s Alpowai in eastern Washington and Fort Simcoe on the Yakama Indian Reservation. more >

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Welcome to Tributaries, a Confluence History Blog

Welcome to Tributaries of Time! This blog is a way for Confluence, through the research of historian Mary Rose, to document the stories that shaped the Columbia River system. Confluence sites are a framework for understanding our region’s origins more deeply. Like streams flowing toward a big river of story, each tale helps us connect in a more meaningful way to where we’ve been and where we’re going. more >